Blog Archives

Forever the Twain Shall Meet

How about a Throwback Thursday from the 19th century?

Literary icon Mark Twain was born on November 30, 1835.

For a blog that emphasizes writing with creative twists on a myriad of events, celebrating the birth of famed author Mark Twain is a must. Actually, it’s more of an act of gratitude to the man who effectively planted the idea in our impressionable minds as young whippersnappers that this thing in school called “literature” expanded beyond the witty and signature verbiage of William Shakespeare (c’mon, we all struggled in memorizing and understanding Shakespeare in sixth-grade) to a more conversational language of rambunctious kids causing trouble and going off on exciting adventures. We related to these stories as if our own, with a little imagination mixed in for good measure and fun. And while there are countless authors in the world, current, past and surely in the future, there is only a handful in relative terms who have risen above the rest to secure and connect with new generations of readers as the years accumulate far beyond the original publish date of declared classics of the written word.

Mark Twain is regarded as one of these masterful wordsmiths.

Your homework assignment is to read or re-read a book by Mark Twain. This time, from his perspective…

one that profoundly changed the trajectory of American literary history.

The Battlefont of Our Generation?

How did this happen?

The man who directed the cinematic masterpiece Titanic just accepted something so pedestrian as the leading brand image of what continues to evolve as his ultimate cinematic universe. We still have no answer, despite an ordinary man’s quest to solve an extraordinary mystery. It’s been a few weeks since we learned of this person’s mission that’s driven by unmistakable, relentless anguish. He’s considered a hero in some circles. Not many circles, but more than one.

We’re still waiting for a press conference from Avatar director James Cameron so he can confront this ever-pressing issue.

The late Steve Jobs (RIP) would probably be happy that we’re discussing fonts with such intensity.

Maybe not about the Papyrus font, but still…

Princess of Pop (Culture)?

Her dad was the “King of Pop” and Wendy’s does serve pop (or soda) at their restaurants…

Paris Jackson is the daughter of the late Michael Jackson. He wrote some songs, danced a little and wore a red leather jacket. Anyways, Paris has understandably stayed away from the spotlight for most of her life. Most of all immediately following the death of her father. But now she seems to be stepping out into the public arena through acting, modeling…

and maybe singing?

While Paris Jackson recently admitted to Jimmy Fallon that she writes songs in private, there doesn’t seem to be any burning desire for her to step onto the biggest musical stage. However, if a certain fast food chain was savvy and paying close attention, they would get Ms. Jackson’s agent on the phone ASAP and collaborate with her on a potential commercial and viral marketing campaign.

Just human nature to put two and two together.

Four Years Later & I’m Still Looking to the Horizon

Exactly 1/10th of a score and two years ago (4 years total), I started Jimmy’s Daily Planet.

Paying homage to the greatest (albeit fictional) newspaper of all-time, The Daily Planet, this blog was founded on my love of my favorite superhero and disguised human of all-time: Superman and Clark Kent. The scene from Richard Donner’s 1978 classic Superman that showed us Christopher Reeve as Clark Kent walk through the bullpen of The Daily Planet for the first time was the moment I knew I wanted to be a journalist. The chaos, palpable energy and big city, skyscraper setting flew from the screen and landed directly into my impressionable imagination.

These few minutes showing reporters preparing to get the scoop, watching exciting individual and group dynamics (papers scattered, people typing, talking and moving) and hearing creative storytelling pitches is arguably my favorite journalistic hook.

I wrote my first blog post (Eight Years Later & We Look to the Horizon) about what the next Facebook would be in the future. The “next big thing”/new dominant social platform hasn’t arrived yet to eclipse Mark Zuckerberg’s social network from his days at Harvard.

This revelation will be realized, it just hasn’t happened quite yet.

One of the questions in blog #1 was whether or not we are an app generation? That answer has not conclusively been determined since July 13, 2012, but people seem to be embracing a hybrid. This translates to using popular sites and social media platforms (ie-Facebook) while simultaneously choosing a diverse selection of acutely personalized social media apps.

The best answer for July 13, 2016 is that we are a splintered population (or customer base) concerning our use of social media and digital applications (sorry, apps). Individualism rules.

What’s next?

That’s still the question. Not the question that Shakespeare wrote for his brilliant play “Hamlet.” Although, in a way, it sort of is. “To be, or not to be – that is the question.” Who will we be in the near future? How will someone revamp our already complex and extensive communicative grid? How will we change as a result? This very idea is thrilling to cogitate because, as Americans, we know a newfangled innovation will collide with destiny. And destiny is a very good friend with this country.

“I know something big and new is coming because that is the American tradition of big sky-big idea dreamers. Until then, start drawing on your dorm room window and think big, plain and simple.”

That’s the final paragraph of my first blog post on Jimmy’s Daily Planet. I remember writing that four years ago and I still believe it’s true today, whatever the wildly crazy idea or dream may be.

Plain and simple.