Blog Archives

Limit Our Daily Apple Intake? Cook Says Yes

Privacy and transparency are odd bedfellows, to say the least. And yet, Apple CEO Tim Cook is attempting to promote this seemingly contradictory amalgamation in the modern tech space while being surrounded by Silicon Valley firms — like Facebook — that are under increasing scrutiny for its lack of privacy and transparency. Throw in user security as a major issue that needs dealing with and a clear resolution that’s a consequence borne out of the lack of widespread privacy and transparency.

The future of technology is entering an interesting intersection with the public in which the real debate regarding within the consumer market is whether these influential tech firms will take the opportunity to look in the mirror and self-regulate for its consumers or if the government (local, state and/or federal) will eventually be required to legislate decisive, impactful action in this powerful industry?

Right now, the public is angry at the lack of privacy that has always been hearsay around our peripheral. But thanks to recent testimony and reporting, disconcerting evidence of violations to our privacy could be reaching a breaking point. Perhaps the numbers of consumers who boycott and/or disconnect from particular digital platforms won’t bankrupt these companies. However, a substantial number of customer departures could, ironically, be enough to significantly disrupt the disruptors of the 21st-century.

Even though Mr. Cook surprisingly advocates for less screen time — if that is a concern for an individual user of an iPhone or related Apple product (of which I agree) — I will surprisingly ask that you set aside thirteen minutes and forty-five seconds of screen time for a recent interview with Apple CEO Tim Cook conducted by Norah O’Donnell, who will be the new anchor of “CBS Evening News.”

I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again: Tim Cook is the best traditional CEO you can get for the ever-expanding tech industry in the Wild West of Silicon Valley in the 21st century because of his thoughtful leadership and inclination to communicate and debate tough issues with some frequency as well as his outspoken thoughts involving transparency and privacy.

Mr. Cook appears to be doing the right things (sans the critically important Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak-level of innovative prowess and imagination) for managing the financial and moral expectations of a firm with a net worth that has been hovering around an estimated $1 trillion.

Tim Cook will never be Steve Jobs as the leader of Apple and that’s ok. The former simply thinks different than the latter.

Now Mr. Cook still has a few big-picture problems that he and his team at Apple need to find solutions to in the near future. One of these problems is an imaginative innovative breakthrough (as noted above), but that’s a discussion for another day.

Regarding user privacy, Mr. Cook and his genius bar in Cupertino would benefit greatly from developing an update for all of its products that are easy to understand and use. And also like its products, this next-level solution to privacy by Apple should be presented in the way the iPod was dramatically brought out of the pocket by the late Mr. Jobs.

The penchant for performing with Hollywood-caliber drama regarding product reveals is unique to Apple — in the architecturally simplistic yet spiritually imposing Steve Jobs Theater no less — and in a time when customers are wary of tech’s expansive reach, a transparent presentation that’s singular in its purpose (privacy) would add an assurance to Apple users while putting the necessary pressure on its competitors and contemporaries in the tech industry to find a similar solution for their companies before government installs its own world wide web of regulations that would assuredly bring a couple of positive changes whilst usher in 98 terrible, horrible, no good, very bad things.

Building more trust, no matter the application will always be insanely great.

Aston Martin Creates New Space in the SUV Market

Wow.

Was Niander Wallace driven around in Aston Martin’s futuristic SUV featured below in ‘Blade Runner 2049’?

Once again, cars are increasingly evolving as the next supercomputer.

The Lagonda’s elegant exterior is an eye-catching vision until the doors open to an interior that is equally stylish and technologically innovative. Perhaps the most surprising element inside this SUV is the gracious spacing for the four total seats in two rows.

On this note, is British car maker Aston Martin remodeling the modern SUV or sedan? The Lagonda SUV is reminiscent of the expensive Maybach sedan interior. With all sorts of money and time being thrown at creating driver-less cars, the next battle between car manufacturers will be designing for either convenience or utility.

Doesn’t the “u” in SUV stand for utility? It’s clear that Aston Martin is challenging the shelf life of this acronym.

The Lagonda is the epitome of luxury and should be viewed as a mere prototype for general design and limited offerings, like its silk-stitching, cashmere, and state-of-the-art computer infrastructure via “the key.” Considering this, the current specifications for this SUV are largely irrelevant. Any of us could make or design something this grand with all the money and resources of Aston Martin. The exciting part, and why this reveal is noteworthy, is because the Lagonda may very well prove to be the template for cars 10-15 years down the road.

The curve of innovation is slow but steady. It’s one of the great, continuous victories of capitalism. And Aston Martin is firmly planting a new flag on this ever-evolving line by presenting an ambitious–albeit unrealistic for anyone not named James Bond–car of the future.

“A dream will not become an innovation if there is no realization.”
–Ciputra, an Indonesian billionaire businessman 

What comes after realization?

According to Aston Martin, ladies and gentlemen, it doesn’t involve starting an internal combustion engine.

H2Zero

There’s a thirst for a clear future.

Approximately 71% of the Earth is covered in water. We’ve all heard this at one point in our lives. Although, it’s somewhat difficult to envision during long road trips across the Midwest when there’s no single large body of water for hundreds of water in any direction. That statistic almost becomes a reverse mirage with spokesman Tom Selleck.

Suppose that’s a perceptive battle of geography. Ironic that a sustainable future may be a little battle defined by geography.

There’s been a continued effort–however subdued–in the innovative pursuit of a car that runs on water, man!

(Bonus points for those who know the pop-culture reference)

In the mainstream, Toyota is leading this effort with its Mirai Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle.

Friendly suggestion: Shorten the name so it could actually fit on the aforementioned car’s bumper.

For a cellular breakdown of how Toyota’s water call works, here’s a helpful video.

The tranquil, effortless and dream-like environmentalism aside–well done, Toyota marketing department–the macro solution to some major global pollution problems involving cars looks like it could be rooted in water-based renewable energy.

Obviously, $60,000 isn’t a welcoming price point for the majority of car owners and lessees. Not even close. Having said that, it is a starting point for developing a reasonably priced water fuel car made by a popular–and trusted–mainstream car company in Toyota. Add in the parallel development of accompanying fueling infrastructure throughout the many different parts of the country–suburban, rural and inner city–from coast to coast and maybe Toyota will be able to succeed where Elon Musk and Tesla are experiencing shortcomings as revealed during a recent 60 Minutes segment.

If the Mirai Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle proves to be the future of the American automobile, then the “O” in H2O will be converted into a zero, as in water’s zero-emission solution.

Making Space for New Stuff

What is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) up to these days?

Whether 2001: A Space Odyssey, Apollo 13, Gravity, Interstellar, The Martian or the forthcoming First Man, Hollywood has piqued movie-going audiences into the vast realities and fantastical possibilities of space.

Sorry, a side note:

The older I get, the more I’m amused at the sheer simplicity of calling the ever-complex and unknown space “space.”

“What’s up there with the infinite stars, planets, moon, sun and all-around cosmic mystery?”

“Space.”

I digress. And so does NASA.

What highly-technical, mind-blowing innovations and life-altering journeys are being planned by NASA for this year and beyond?

Things…on a To-Do list.