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H2Zero

There’s a thirst for a clear future.

Approximately 71% of the Earth is covered in water. We’ve all heard this at one point in our lives. Although, it’s somewhat difficult to envision during long road trips across the Midwest when there’s no single large body of water for hundreds of water in any direction. That statistic almost becomes a reverse mirage with spokesman Tom Selleck.

Suppose that’s a perceptive battle of geography. Ironic that a sustainable future may be a little battle defined by geography.

There’s been a continued effort–however subdued–in the innovative pursuit of a car that runs on water, man!

(Bonus points for those who know the pop-culture reference)

In the mainstream, Toyota is leading this effort with its Mirai Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle.

Friendly suggestion: Shorten the name so it could actually fit on the aforementioned car’s bumper.

For a cellular breakdown of how Toyota’s water call works, here’s a helpful video.

The tranquil, effortless and dream-like environmentalism aside–well done, Toyota marketing department–the macro solution to some major global pollution problems involving cars looks like it could be rooted in water-based renewable energy.

Obviously, $60,000 isn’t a welcoming price point for the majority of car owners and lessees. Not even close. Having said that, it is a starting point for developing a reasonably priced water fuel car made by a popular–and trusted–mainstream car company in Toyota. Add in the parallel development of accompanying fueling infrastructure throughout the many different parts of the country–suburban, rural and inner city–from coast to coast and maybe Toyota will be able to succeed where Elon Musk and Tesla are experiencing shortcomings as revealed during a recent 60 Minutes segment.

If the Mirai Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle proves to be the future of the American automobile, then the “O” in H2O will be converted into a zero, as in water’s zero-emission solution.