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H2Zero

There’s a thirst for a clear future.

Approximately 71% of the Earth is covered in water. We’ve all heard this at one point in our lives. Although, it’s somewhat difficult to envision during long road trips across the Midwest when there’s no single large body of water for hundreds of water in any direction. That statistic almost becomes a reverse mirage with spokesman Tom Selleck.

Suppose that’s a perceptive battle of geography. Ironic that a sustainable future may be a little battle defined by geography.

There’s been a continued effort–however subdued–in the innovative pursuit of a car that runs on water, man!

(Bonus points for those who know the pop-culture reference)

In the mainstream, Toyota is leading this effort with its Mirai Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle.

Friendly suggestion: Shorten the name so it could actually fit on the aforementioned car’s bumper.

For a cellular breakdown of how Toyota’s water call works, here’s a helpful video.

The tranquil, effortless and dream-like environmentalism aside–well done, Toyota marketing department–the macro solution to some major global pollution problems involving cars looks like it could be rooted in water-based renewable energy.

Obviously, $60,000 isn’t a welcoming price point for the majority of car owners and lessees. Not even close. Having said that, it is a starting point for developing a reasonably priced water fuel car made by a popular–and trusted–mainstream car company in Toyota. Add in the parallel development of accompanying fueling infrastructure throughout the many different parts of the country–suburban, rural and inner city–from coast to coast and maybe Toyota will be able to succeed where Elon Musk and Tesla are experiencing shortcomings as revealed during a recent 60 Minutes segment.

If the Mirai Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle proves to be the future of the American automobile, then the “O” in H2O will be converted into a zero, as in water’s zero-emission solution.

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Perspective Day

Today is Earth Day, which means that for 24 hours only, we need to individually and collectively care for the planet we live on.

Or, perhaps, we should do this everyday.

Protocol for most everybody is to be courteous of nature. This is demonstrated by us throwing trash away daily, recycling each week and engaging with nature in its various forms in peaceful, respectful fashion. And yet, there are still those who see the coming apocalypse with every plastic bag in a grocery store, every napkin blown to the ground by a gust of wind and every private jet polluting the air…except when en route to multimillion dollar environmental conferences.

Wouldn’t a conference call or video chat be more environmentally sustainable if the planet is in such dire jeopardy?

There is no argument that we all want clean water, fresh air and for animals to live in the wild without being proactively and unnecessarily targeted. However, in the grand environmental argument, there does need to be some perspective injected about the complicated, surprisingly youthful relationship between humans and nature.

The late George Carlin was a brilliant observational stand-up comedian and thinker. If you’re wondering if he had any thoughts on the environmental movement and even Earth Day in particular, then check out the video clip below. It’s just a slice of his full routine on the subject (which is hilarious and relevant), but for language sake, here’s a portion that is 100% suitable for all ages (a rare find in classic George Carlin rants) that hits on his major point.

Just continue to be in awe of what the Earth has to show us in 2015…on this Wednesday.

Usually, I Order a Coke with No Ice…

In partnership with Ogilvy & Mather Bogota, Coca-Cola may have just started a cool sustainability revolution with its ice bottle. According to a July 9, 2013 Foxnews.com article, “Coca-Cola unveils new bottle made of ice,” the popular soda/pop (a serious debate, I know) maker gave the sweating populace of Colombia the rare icicle-like treat.

The ice bottle appears to be precisely what you would imagine it to be: ice that is frozen in the shape of a Coca-Cola bottle, with a rubber band around the middle for holding and drinking convenience, with the refreshing soda/pop cooled to the perfect temperature inside.

Just as long as it is easy to drink with an ice bottle opening and that famous scene from “A Christmas Story” doesn’t occur, then the general public should be in good shape. If need be, adjustments then have to be made.

It’s hot outside. What feels good on a hot summer day? Ice. What’s even better than ice? Ice with chilled Coca-Cola! But here’s the genius of it all: The outer and inner contents of the ice bottle will refreshingly chill your heat soaked bones. It’s a win-win. Actually though, since the bottle is made of ice, that means once you are finished drinking or using the bottle, it simply melts away without becoming trash.

It’s a win-win-win!

With the number of countries throughout the world that experience hot weather all year-round or even just seasonally hot weather like in the United States of America, the potential for this commercial product could be astronomical. Imagine the continents of South America, Africa and Australia for starters. Middle Eastern countries also tend to be on the slightly warmer side. Specifically, Dubai is always looking to the future and embraces some Western ideas and tendencies.

Imagine going to the beach during Summer vacation and instead of having to lug around a cooler filled with empty soda/pop bottles or cans at the end of the day…well, now you don’t have to. The cooler would be significantly lighter. Incredibly, this idea could spread to adult beverages. Because water is a key ingredient in beer, it is manageable. The recipe would have to be altered and thoroughly tested, but it is workable.

Wouldn’t you try a Coca-Cola or a Corona in an ice bottle on a hot Summer day?

Environmental sustainability is a vitally important issue and Coca-Cola’s seemingly simple ice bottle could be the practical product the public embraces globally just like Coca-Cola itself. Having traveled all around the world, I will speak from extensive experience when I say American consumer goods, like Coca-Cola, Pepsi and McDonald’s are very popular. In the case of the Coca-Cola ice bottle, the brand is already well-established and a favorite with millions of people.

If managed properly (cost, distribution, etc.) and affordable pricing is offered to the public, then we could be on the cusp of a global effort to positively and realistically preserve the environment.

Some of our worries could just melt away…

P.S. Two suggestions to Coca-Cola: don’t use a rubber band (use something recyclable) and make the gripping band larger so it can be hand-held, not finger-held.