I’d Kill to Ride the Orient-Express

“Flashback Friday” is a thing in American culture.

But what about “Flash-Forward Friday”?

Murder on the Orient Express was a very well-received 20th century novel by Agatha Christie. In part, that praise may be the result of the stunning views and luxurious cabins that make up a train ride on and along the Orient-Express.

Breathtakingly beautiful.

Returning to Ms. Christie’s literary prowess, some may argue that her engaging mystery is a giant in the realm of crime fiction. And the reason the aforementioned category “crime fiction” is not limited to books in the previous sentence is because, as it’s turning out, Murder on the Orient Express is looking more and more like a thrilling cinematic ride in its own right.

Slated for theatrical release on November 10, 2017, the film’s cast (Kenneth Branagh, Johnny Depp, Daisy Ridley, Michelle Pfeiffer, Judi Dench, Penélope Cruz, Josh Gad, Leslie Odom Jr., Willem Dafoe) is preparing audiences for unrestrained (ironic, yes, I know) chaos this November that can only be matched by our own wild and crazy Thanksgiving dinners.

Here’s an early Thanksgiving treat: A second helping of sorts for Murder on the Orient Express in the form of its second (and recently released) trailer.  

Should I read the book or just wait and see the movie?

Reading is fun, that’s true. However, if I read the book before seeing the film and, thereby, discover all the entertaining spoilers, would I go mental? To that I might say, duh.

That never-ending, fundamental conundrum continues to (metaphorically) kill book and movie lovers. The back-and-forth book vs. movie debate will never reveal its definitive killer and victim (of sorts) to the end of providing a standardized answer in every person’s case…

unlike a certain train full of fascinatingly suspicious passengers.

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Driving Mister Foo Fighters

When you’re singing in the car (admit it, we all do it), we feel like a rock star. Our voice is in perfect pitch and we begin to ponder whether we missed out on our true calling in life.

We feel, in so any words, like we’re flying.

And then that moment happens when the song suddenly ends and we hear the remnants of what was really a bit of, shall we say, a musical disaster. It’s at this point that our balloon of rock stardom is dashed and we appreciate the skill actual musicians and bands possess. However, we have to keep on driving.

If only an entire rock band would sit and sing in the car with us…

The Foo Fighters have a way of getting the best out of us in all kinds of life’s moments.

We feel, in so many words, like we’re always learning to fly.

Finally, a Raider Who Knows How to Win

While she is super strong and skilled and considered a hero among some, she doesn’t quite meet the standard for a traditional superhero. She doesn’t fly, have x-ray vision or have a otherwordly hammer. And in the age of cinematic superheroes, despite subtle and clearly distinguishable differences, many presume that all superheroes are the same.

That idea is wrong, but that’s an analysis for a different day.

The 2018 version of Lara Croft (Alicia Vikander) will challenge that generalized perception by adding a necessary space. Lara Croft is not a superhero with super powers, but a super hero with seemingly relatable abilities.

Well, relatable and attainable in the close, but still far away sense, I suppose.

Like up, up and away…

Mark Z. Has Sent You a Friend Request

To enjoy the simpler things in life, one friend at a time…

Technology, regardless of its wireless capabilities, is tethered to us in ways that far exceed any normally perceived relationship between person and machine. This seemingly unrivaled dedication extends for all hours of the day and night, all occasions and all cognitive curiosities. Much like the glow of a smartphone, tablet or computer, technology’s light burns ever-so-brightly as it becomes a legitimate chore to resist its attractive intrigue and promise of brand new information through the evolving medium of social media.

Unless your name is Andy Samberg, apparently.

Helping someone out with settings on a computer is like helping someone move:

A true friend.