Blog Archives

Welcome to the Christmas Movie Shelf, Pal

Is ‘Die Hard’ a Christmas movie?

This is a heated debate that rages throughout the entire year–almost as much as the fictional Nakatomi Plaza skyscraper did that fateful night–for movie fans (and even non-movie fans) of the 1988 action film masterpiece that starred Bruce Willis, Alan Rickman (RIP), Bonnie Bedelia and Reginald VelJohnson (Carl Winslow!) and Alexander Godunov (RIP). Due to the extensive conversation that follows this seemingly fun and nonsensical question, it’s best to exercise brevity whenever possible. With that in mind, here are a few key notes regarding the aforementioned debate.

Just last year, ‘Die Hard’ screenwriter Steven E. de Souza confirmed via Twitter that #DieHardIsAChristmasMovie.

FYI – That specific tweet was covered and discussed on Time’s website.

Yes, that Time.

Then there’s this snippet from a Washington Post article published yesterday online titled “‘Die Hard’ isn’t just a Christmas movie — it’s the best ever, according to its Hollywood distributor” by Eli Rosenberg and Alex Horton.

“Christmas is a liminal ritualized period of carnivalesque inversion during which underdogs and the powerless are briefly elevated above hierarchical structures,” historian Greg Jenner wrote on Twitter. “John McClane is a classic Christmas underdog triumphing over selfish venality.”  

So this is a very real debate. So gloriously real that 20th Century Fox has reignited the topic of its popular film via a recently produced trailer just this week that is every bit as awesome as you’d hope it would be.

Is ‘Die Hard’ a Christmas movie?

Yes. 

Make room, Elf on the Shelf.

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Fast-Changing Times Not at Ridgemont High

A Jimmy’s Daily Planet Blog Tease:

Wednesday = H2Zero

Thursday = The Orb(I Tell)

Friday = An Eagle’s Perch

Normally, I write my blog posts on the day and in the moment. True story. However, feeling inspired by today’s blog, I decided to randomly type headlines I thought sounded cool without knowing what they will be about.

We’ll see how this works.


Now, if you’re wondering:

Advertising and marketing continue to evolve by the day with short video content, by the way.

Or “BTW,” as the text-savvy kids say.

And the folks at Netflix, partnering with the ‘Stranger Things’ team–a smash hit original series based in the 1980s with impressive storytelling and era-capturing precision–recently dropped a clever teaser trailer for its pending teaser trailer for the highly-anticipated third season.

It’s being called a “Title Tease.” Ok…Well, now I’m curious to see what’s coming next in television and commercial marketing.

Anyways, unlike conventional sitcoms, this binge-worthy show purposely releases all ten episodes that make up each season at once. Admittedly, this causes a Tostitos mild salsa-caliber spoiler. Or perhaps like the salsa, it merely introduces a satisfying taste (or tease) of the full meal?

You be the judge.

Wait…they had Tostitos in the ’80s, right? Regardless, here’s the aforementioned teaser trailer for the pending teaser trailer for the third season of ‘Stranger Things.’

While 2019 is a little vague for a drop date, 1980-something works perfectly for ‘The Goldbergs.’ So it’s time to put up–and keep up–Christmas lights for all of 2019. 

P.S. Yes, Tostitos chips were around in the ’80s! 

The Last Furry Action Hero

The 1984 cult classic ‘Gremlins’ has stood the test of time–well, at least 34 years thus far–as a case study in the cinematic quality and effectiveness of practical effects. Specifically, puppeteering. While CGI (computer-generated imagery) has its place in films, that place should be limited and difficult to decipher or not distracting from reality.

Gizmo is proof of this.

Once again: That movie called ‘Gremlins’ achieved this impressive feat in the mid-’80s. Yes. It’s true.

And the rewards for dedication to practical effect artistry in the ever-innovative movie industry almost can’t be measured in tangible metrics. The expectation for good storytelling demands the best of everything while we escape into a fantasy setting, which includes two-dimensional ropes for audiences to hang onto.

This expectation even reaches (well, reached) into our own reality.

Warner Bros. understood that blurring the line–and even creating a direct link–between a movie and our daily life is the most valuable metric.

A metric that shouldn’t be tracked past midnight.

Happy Monday!

The influence of the ’80s aren’t going anywhere on TV, movies or music–both in nostalgic throwbacks and as a pop-culture golden age–and that’s a good thing.

Actually, that’s an awesome thing.

Exhibit June  4, 1984:

At least we can rest easy and listen to The Midnight after midnight while eating food without fear, unlike some furry friends who first showed up on June 8, 1984…

Have a Better Week Than Last Week.