Blog Archives

Happy Monday

The Last Jedi trailer is here…

I think a few people will see Star Wars: The Last Jedi in movie theaters this Christmas. The film’s director and screenwriter Rian Johnson continues to show that he’s the real deal within the beloved fictional cinematic world of Star Wars.

Is it Christmas yet?

Have a Better Week Than Last Week. 

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This Is Us

How can we best tell our story to the world?

According to Steven Spielberg, we can best tell our story by projecting it with the people in it…along with a little imagination and uncertainty.

Spielberg, a forthcoming HBO documentary, is a double-edged sword.

On the one hand, I (and most likely everyone else on the planet) cannot wait to see this in-depth look into everything Steven Spielberg. The man is a cinematic and storytelling trailblazer. On the other hand, the fact that an in-depth documentary about Steven Spielberg’s life has been filmed, produced and is ready for showtime HBO means that he’s lived a full life and that it’s now time to just reflect…?

Fortunately, the greatest filmmaker in history (my humble opinion) isn’t slowing down one bit.

Ready Player One, directed by the man, the myth and the legend, is set for release with high-anticipation next year. Then, of course, the famed director has another Indiana Jones film. Plus, he has at least a couple more Jurassic World’s to produce and guide during the next several years.

That’s the good news. Now here’s some more. We won’t just be entertained by Steven Spielberg’s imaginative movies about virtual reality, genetically modified dinosaurs causing chaos in the modern world or an adventurous professor from the mid-20th century. Moreover, we’ll be entertained by stories about, well, ourselves. That’s the true storytelling genius of Spielberg.

He suspends focus on himself in order for all of us to believe in ourselves in ways we never thought possible.

And an accompanying John Williams score doesn’t hurt either…

Spielberg premieres on HBO on Saturday, October 7th.

I’d Kill to Ride the Orient-Express

“Flashback Friday” is a thing in American culture.

But what about “Flash-Forward Friday”?

Murder on the Orient Express was a very well-received 20th century novel by Agatha Christie. In part, that praise may be the result of the stunning views and luxurious cabins that make up a train ride on and along the Orient-Express.

Breathtakingly beautiful.

Returning to Ms. Christie’s literary prowess, some may argue that her engaging mystery is a giant in the realm of crime fiction. And the reason the aforementioned category “crime fiction” is not limited to books in the previous sentence is because, as it’s turning out, Murder on the Orient Express is looking more and more like a thrilling cinematic ride in its own right.

Slated for theatrical release on November 10, 2017, the film’s cast (Kenneth Branagh, Johnny Depp, Daisy Ridley, Michelle Pfeiffer, Judi Dench, Penélope Cruz, Josh Gad, Leslie Odom Jr., Willem Dafoe) is preparing audiences for unrestrained (ironic, yes, I know) chaos this November that can only be matched by our own wild and crazy Thanksgiving dinners.

Here’s an early Thanksgiving treat: A second helping of sorts for Murder on the Orient Express in the form of its second (and recently released) trailer.  

Should I read the book or just wait and see the movie?

Reading is fun, that’s true. However, if I read the book before seeing the film and, thereby, discover all the entertaining spoilers, would I go mental? To that I might say, duh.

That never-ending, fundamental conundrum continues to (metaphorically) kill book and movie lovers. The back-and-forth book vs. movie debate will never reveal its definitive killer and victim (of sorts) to the end of providing a standardized answer in every person’s case…

unlike a certain train full of fascinatingly suspicious passengers.

Finally, a Raider Who Knows How to Win

While she is super strong and skilled and considered a hero among some, she doesn’t quite meet the standard for a traditional superhero. She doesn’t fly, have x-ray vision or have a otherwordly hammer. And in the age of cinematic superheroes, despite subtle and clearly distinguishable differences, many presume that all superheroes are the same.

That idea is wrong, but that’s an analysis for a different day.

The 2018 version of Lara Croft (Alicia Vikander) will challenge that generalized perception by adding a necessary space. Lara Croft is not a superhero with super powers, but a super hero with seemingly relatable abilities.

Well, relatable and attainable in the close, but still far away sense, I suppose.

Like up, up and away…