Blog Archives

History’s Kaleidoscopic Amelioration

The world has never been black and white. Every now and then, it’s important to be reminded of this reality. Need proof with grit and undeniable realism?

That’s coming in a minute.

Dating back to history class with our generations-worn textbooks and age-old documentaries, which project major historical events from the mid-20th century and 19th century (primarily) in black and white, we are almost involuntarily conditioned to imagine life “back then” in a simplistic, unrelatable fashion. Of course, a significant reason for this misguided perception has been the determined yet ever-so-gradual development of film (still and motion).

The arc of technological progress moves at various rates.

Speaking of which, famed ‘Lord of the Rings’ director Peter Jackson, in concert with Warner Bros. Pictures, is aiming to rock our world cinematically by taking a large leap forward to showcase when the world was being rocked for real.

Ladies and gentlemen, please enjoy the new trailer for the documentary of the Great War (1914-1918) titled ‘They Shall Not Grow Old.’

 

Incredible.

To the disbelief of those born into a fully-immersed technicolor world, life has always been in high-definition.

True story.

Our resolution has always been 4K.

Yes.

And hopefully, the technology used to transform the Great War into a vivid, deeply consequential global conflict will be seen as more of something akin to yesteryear and less of simply a time gone by. This film technology, as painstaking a process as it is, needs to be utilized for more history-altering events in human history that will alter how we live in the present and positively impact what will transpire in the future.

We know that if we don’t learn from history, we are doomed to repeat it. But what if we learn (well, see) history in ways we never imagined or perceived were possible?

‘They Shall Not Grow Old’ will be in select theaters on December 17 and December 27.

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Happy Monday!

Movies need to be more realistic. Movies need to feel like it’s really happening.

Well, following the success of ‘The Jungle Book’ live-action (of sorts) remake, Disney is at it again with ‘The Lion King.’

Will this new ‘Lion King’ succeed at the box office? Can it possibly live up to the wonder of the original animated classic from 1994? Will this new adaptation add anything new or simply be a retelling or the aforementioned 1994 animation?

For now–until July 19, 2019, theatrical release date–let’s just live each day before then by two words:

Hakuna Matata.

No worries, just anticipation.

Have a Better Week Than Last Week. 

P.S. James Earl Jones returned for this new ‘Lion King.’ Yes, that James Earl Jones. 

It’s Not the Catalina Wine Mixer, But…

A sequel to ‘Step Brothers’ doesn’t appear to be happening anytime this century. The popular comedy starring Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly appears to be a standalone favorite. Is that a good thing? A bad thing?

The debate rages on.

What is happening is a new film called ‘Holmes and Watson’ that stars Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly, which happens to be a comedy.

Hmmm…

Is ‘Holmes and Watson’ a Step Brothers’ sequel in disguise? Wouldn’t that be exactly what Brennan and Dale would do? Weren’t Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson like brothers in a sense?

Well played, Dragon and Night Hawk, well played.

In How Many Years Will ‘Replicas’ Be Certifiability Science-Fiction?

Keanu Reeves is starring in a mind-bending replicating a science-fiction movie.

Enough said.

Promising big ideas like our role in scientific innovation, the future of AI that is on the equal intellectual ground as humans and control versus independence, ‘Replicas’ starring Keanu Reeves and Thomas Middleditch seems to have the ingredients for a memorable–and perhaps prescient–show that merely begins in the form of cinematic entertainment. The inspiration for some of society’s great inventors can be cited in films just like ‘Replicas.’

The question may not be what someone will attempt to do within this field after seeing this film. The key question to wonder about is what people are doing right now in this field of study?

Or will do…?

At least for us moviegoers, we’ll discover what ‘Replicas’ is all about soon.