Blog Archives

Virtual Reality’s Impending Prize

We’re one day closer to March 29, 2018, with a brand new trailer…

Ready Player One has the challenge of following a highly-acclaimed book, but with one minor advantage:

Its director is Steven Spielberg.

The VR-centric story set in a dystopian future in Columbus, OH-IO splits time between the real world and an imaginative pop culture-rich virtual reality. The latter is filled with familiar throwbacks to iconic video games, music, and cinematic masterpieces in their own rights (ie-Back to the Future and Jurassic Park, to name just a couple). While this virtual reality purposely appears surreal, VR’s increasing role in modern society seems inevitable once a few codes are cracked for taking this experience mainstream in the coming years and decades.

Is this good? Bad? Somewhere in between? Time will ultimately tell with our ever-evolving relationship and fluid connectivity with deeply personal customizable technology. Regardless, a monstrous, life-altering prize awaits in the third act of Ready Player One.

However, will virtual reality lead society to an equally grand and illustrious prize down the road? Will currently living in Columbus, Ohio offer an exclusive key to this future?

There are just so many real questions to ponder…

maybe this is where virtual answers come into play?


Short Film’s Latest (& Mostly) Silent Era

“…on this day in 2006, the company that brought the world the blockbuster hits Toy Story (1995), A Bug’s Life (1998), Monsters, Inc. (2001), Finding Nemo (2003) and The Incredibles (2004) was sold to the Walt Disney Company, their longtime distributor, for a staggering $7.4 billion.”
–Walt Disney announces $7.4 billion purchase of Pixar,

Pixar is an ever-evolving, multi-generational animation game-changer for both in short & feature films. This animation studio, part of Walt Disney, has produced some of the greatest animated movies of all-time. Not all, of course. Let’s not be hyperbolic with no memory of the illustrious past in this industry. However, Pixar’s uniquely subtle style for five to six-minute shorts is something to marvel at with a great deal of satisfaction and happiness.

Bet you didn’t expect that director commentary in the middle of an analysis of Pixar’s animated storytelling techniques. It changes the way you view the whole video, right?

Just call it the eternal magic of movies, real and imagined.

Setting the Stage for Star Wars

Star Wars isn’t going anywhere, folks.

It’s Thursday and the following interview with Mark Hamill on the practical “Death Star” set is a nice throwback and early sobering assessment of what Star Wars was and was going to be to movie fans as the original trilogy was just beginning to change the world forever.

While Mr. Hamill’s drawing of a cinematic line between Star Wars and The Wizard of Oz sounds as ridiculous as two suns on Tatooine back in the ’70s, what time has proven is that there is, in fact, a link between that famous yellow brick road and the ultimate good vs. evil battle in a galaxy far, far away…

and that link is movie magic.

When films welcome and embrace that powerful escapist sensation, that’s when we, the fans, are granted permission and encouraged to travel to far-off worlds and galaxies we never knew were possible to reach within ourselves.

Sometimes in less than 12 parsecs.

The Battlefont of Our Generation?

How did this happen?

The man who directed the cinematic masterpiece Titanic just accepted something so pedestrian as the leading brand image of what continues to evolve as his ultimate cinematic universe. We still have no answer, despite an ordinary man’s quest to solve an extraordinary mystery. It’s been a few weeks since we learned of this person’s mission that’s driven by unmistakable, relentless anguish. He’s considered a hero in some circles. Not many circles, but more than one.

We’re still waiting for a press conference from Avatar director James Cameron so he can confront this ever-pressing issue.

The late Steve Jobs (RIP) would probably be happy that we’re discussing fonts with such intensity.

Maybe not about the Papyrus font, but still…