Blog Archives

What Does the Foxx Say?

It has been way, way too long since Jamie Foxx has been in the news.

Luckily, Mr. Foxx not only makes an appearance in today’s blog post, but also proves why he is, as Jay Leno puts it, entertainment’s “Renaissance Man.” And, in the process, consoles an entire city draped in sadness with a brand new lyrical bedtime story.

Cleveland, OH tourism: If you’re watching and reading this, get Jamie Foxx’s agents on the phone ASAP.

Plus, call LeBron James as well.

The excitement when speaking about popular destinations in and around Cleveland, OH by LeBron James is the best pitch for a city I’ve seen in a long, long time.

That rocked.

Richard Donner is Super, Man

Richard Donner’s 1978 cinematic masterpiece Superman is considered the greatest (and the most perfect) superhero movie ever made. That’s not just my opinion, but the opinion of some of the most influential people in the movie industry. Director Christopher Nolan said the following regarding the Richard Donnner-directed Superman.

“I said, ‘I want to do for Batman what Dick Donner did for Superman,’ ” Christopher Nolan humbly states in the opening of his nearly half-hour conversation with the director of the original “Superman.”
Kevin Jagernauth, IndieWire

Need more proof of the super genius Richard Donner showcased in that unforgettable origin story of Kal-El/Clark Kent/Superman way back in the late ’70s with Christopher Reeve?

How about getting the super rivals DC Films president Geoff Johns and Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige to wholeheartedly agree on the personal impact and storytelling legacy of 87-year-old Richard Donner and, specifically, that Superman film (a priceless DC property)?

Some of Hollywoods biggest stars, in front of the camera and behind the camera, gathered together recently to celebrate and honor the unforgettable work of the legendary director and producer Richard Donner at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Los Angeles. Actors and actresss from his most popular movies were in attendance, including the primary cast of Lethal Weapon and the kids from The Goonies.

Here are a few of Richard Donner’s films/credits:

  • The Omen (1976)
  • Superman (1978)
  • Superman II (1980)
  • The Goonies (1985)
  • Lethal Weapon (1987)
  • Lethal Weapon 2 (1989)
  • Lethal Weapon 3 (1992)
  • Maverick (1994)
  • Lethal Weapon 4 (1998)

This celebration of Mr. Donner’s work reaffirms the belief (and I’m a firm believer in the following) that a cinematic masterpiece does not always require mind-blowing special effects or the biggest explosions or the use of bad language for the sake of using bad language for that edge or street cred. Sometimes, a great movie just requires a hero people can believe in who struggles with similar issues and moral dilemmas as the people watching in theaters and at home.

That, above all, is Richard Donner’s storytelling legacy. In this sense, Richard Donner is a super man superman.

A Shadow’s Hidden Brilliance

One of the greatest aspects about film (beyond its ratios) is the fact that some movies showcase vivid colors and some movies showcase black and white and, despite this monumental difference in appearance, the quality of the story rarely ever suffers as a result.

Ladies and gentlemen, the latter will be explored in today’s blog post.

Like yesterday’s post, there certainly are scenes I would add and delete from YouTube user Now You See It’s montage of famous movie clips. Having said this, the video below is a pleasant reminder of the uniquely artistic quality that black and white films gave audiences during the early decades of the still burgeoning movie-making medium. The simplicity, the contrasts and the shadows, if shot correctly and if utilized correctly with clever storytelling, has the power to effortlessly shock, surprise and guide a movie and its engaged audience along a wonderful journey to a variety of discoveries.

I bet you’re thinking what I am:

What would these classic black and white films look like in 4K?

I____I (A Director Framing That Perfect Shot)

When a movie becomes more than a movie to us, that’s when a movie transforms into that movie.

We love films for countless reasons that are equally objective and subjective. Whether it’s the story, cast, settings, director, subject or that it simply arrived at seemingly the perfect time during our life for some reason or another, we never forget our favorite movies. Part of this admiration typically includes an unforgettable shot(s) by the director. These visionary moments, either revolutionary or an example of a trademark directorial style, speak to us in profound ways.

True story.

Thankfully, YouTube exists and serves as a prime medium for creating and sharing content that speaks to us in myriad fashions. For this blog post, YouTube user The Solomon Society has gifted viewers with a video deftly titled, “The Most Beautiful Shots In Movie History.” I would add some different shots (and delete a few), but the video below is off to a good start. 

When one shot can capture the magic of an entire movie, that’s typically when people declare (personally and publicly) we need to see that movie.