Blog Archives

Jaws Needs the Deep Blue Sea

Have you ever wondered why giant great white sharks (ie-Jaws) aren’t showcased in aquariums?

I’ll help you out with your curiosity.

In addition to the extensively reported video above, let’s not forget about Jaws 3-D (a great white shark swimming inside a Florida SeaWorld) and Deep Blue Sea (attempted the containment of giant great white sharks in the open ocean). Keeping these two fictional realities in mind likely made aquarium owners think twice about bringing in a large great white shark into its custody.

And yes, that’s very likely a true presumption.

Want another legitimate cinematic reference point of caution?

Enter Jurassic Park. As Dr. Ian Malcolm would say, “Life…finds a way.” And it’s not always what you want or expect.

As amazing as it would be to witness a giant great white shark from the comfort of an aquarium, that’s simply not realistic at this moment in time. Beyond being realistic, the safety of the shark and its handlers is priority number one. And this massive undertaking is not safe for both parties involved. It’s simply not worth the risk.

But, on the bright side, giant great white sharks continue to offer us an open invitation to visit them in the comfort of their home: the ocean.

I think I’m still busy that night.

Happy Throwback Thursday!

This is “Shark Week,” which has inspired today’s “Throwback Thursday.”

Sharks are powerfully majestic creatures, though we never want to be swimming in the ocean and see a fin hovering just above the water’s surface. But even as terrifying of a sight as that is, sometimes a story can have a similar effect. The video below is known as one of the greatest monologues in the history of cinema. The setting is rickety old boat, bobbing up and down in the middle of the ocean off the coast of a vacation town in the American northeast.

It’s real. It’s raw. It’s got a real bite to it.

Happy Throwback Thursday!

Happy Shark Week!

In honor of The Discovery Channel’s annual phenomenon known as “Shark Week,” today’s post will (of course) feature a shark-related video. Is it the teeth? The fins? The terrifying mystery of whether a shark is swimming beneath or around you in the ocean? Is it pure curiosity stemming from watching a movie by this guy named Steven Spielberg that practically scared everybody from swimming at beaches in the summertime?

Whatever the reason for tuning in is, it’s a fascinating time of year to safely observe and learn something new about the most feared (and possibly admired) predators in our oceans.

Take a Real Bite Out of This Week!

I Have a Question…Actually, I Have More Than One

Why do we watch? Despite the fact it’s become a cultural phenomenon to millions of people, why do we, individually, sit on a couch and decidedly press the buttons on the controller that take us to The Discovery Channel for “Shark Week?” To discover something new I suppose.

“Shark Week,” in the literal sense, is a week of documentaries and informative stories about sharks, their habits, dangerously incredible close-ups, new revelations and so forth. In the metaphorical sense, it’s an opportunity over several days to revert back to our instincts of elementary school. What does this mean exactly? Reflecting on our experiences from kindergarten through the fifth grade, one of the constants was our insistence to learn as much about something that peeked our interest as possible. Whether it was sharks, bears, insects, adventures in books, sports, math, Sega Genesis, Nintendo, science, etc., we were hooked. We were not just thirsty for Capri Sun, but also for knowledge.

The amount of information we wanted to absorb was boundless. Do you think I’m wrong? If you have any nephews, nieces, sons or daughters around the preschool to elementary school age, try to compute just how many questions they ask you about anything and everything on a daily basis. Why? Why? Why!?

It’s their nature. It’s instinctive. Nobody tells them at a young age to ask a limitless amount of questions. They just do. Then, during the teenage years of our lives, we transition to a phase when we don’t seek as many answers to questions that are academically related. At some point though, we cycle back around to find the glow of knowledge from our younger days that rejuvenates an inner spark and desire to want to learn about what surrounds us and how everything works.

Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?

Some of you may be wondering why there were so many questions asked throughout this post? Because if nobody asks questions, how do we discover anything new? How do learn where we come from? How do we know where we are going? Where do great white sharks mate? Do sharks really mistake humans for seals? How do painters dream up their masterpieces? Do aliens exist? Will somebody ever invent a teleportation device? How has there not been a new “Bill & Ted’s” adventure made in more than twenty years?

This week, it’s sharks. What will it be tomorrow? The day after that? Next week?

Good question.