Blog Archives

Jaws Needs the Deep Blue Sea

Have you ever wondered why giant great white sharks (ie-Jaws) aren’t showcased in aquariums?

I’ll help you out with your curiosity.

In addition to the extensively reported video above, let’s not forget about Jaws 3-D (a great white shark swimming inside a Florida SeaWorld) and Deep Blue Sea (attempted the containment of giant great white sharks in the open ocean). Keeping these two fictional realities in mind likely made aquarium owners think twice about bringing in a large great white shark into its custody.

And yes, that’s very likely a true presumption.

Want another legitimate cinematic reference point of caution?

Enter Jurassic Park. As Dr. Ian Malcolm would say, “Life…finds a way.” And it’s not always what you want or expect.

As amazing as it would be to witness a giant great white shark from the comfort of an aquarium, that’s simply not realistic at this moment in time. Beyond being realistic, the safety of the shark and its handlers is priority number one. And this massive undertaking is not safe for both parties involved. It’s simply not worth the risk.

But, on the bright side, giant great white sharks continue to offer us an open invitation to visit them in the comfort of their home: the ocean.

I think I’m still busy that night.

The Real Deep Blue Sea

It seems as if Steven Spielberg’s defining summer blockbuster Jaws may have had more than just a toe dipped in the water involving the true events that inspired his film.

As people’s bravery increases simultaneously with the improved strength of metal cages designed for underwater hovering, their terrifying interactions with giant sharks reveal new discoveries about the aggressive, yet surprisingly tranquil super predators of the ocean.

Brand new footage of the largest shark ever recorded on video from a dive off the Mexican coast in 2013 was just released to the public. Her name is Deep Blue.

Deep Blue’s size is so colossal that it begs the question as to whether Spielberg and Co. built a new animatronic shark and let it loose in the waters off Guadalupe Island. This great white is suspected to be about 50 years-old and is estimated to be at least 20 feet long.

In the movie Jaws, the monster shark measured at around 25 feet.

It’s been 40 years and we still need a bigger boat.

I Have a Question…Actually, I Have More Than One

Why do we watch? Despite the fact it’s become a cultural phenomenon to millions of people, why do we, individually, sit on a couch and decidedly press the buttons on the controller that take us to The Discovery Channel for “Shark Week?” To discover something new I suppose.

“Shark Week,” in the literal sense, is a week of documentaries and informative stories about sharks, their habits, dangerously incredible close-ups, new revelations and so forth. In the metaphorical sense, it’s an opportunity over several days to revert back to our instincts of elementary school. What does this mean exactly? Reflecting on our experiences from kindergarten through the fifth grade, one of the constants was our insistence to learn as much about something that peeked our interest as possible. Whether it was sharks, bears, insects, adventures in books, sports, math, Sega Genesis, Nintendo, science, etc., we were hooked. We were not just thirsty for Capri Sun, but also for knowledge.

The amount of information we wanted to absorb was boundless. Do you think I’m wrong? If you have any nephews, nieces, sons or daughters around the preschool to elementary school age, try to compute just how many questions they ask you about anything and everything on a daily basis. Why? Why? Why!?

It’s their nature. It’s instinctive. Nobody tells them at a young age to ask a limitless amount of questions. They just do. Then, during the teenage years of our lives, we transition to a phase when we don’t seek as many answers to questions that are academically related. At some point though, we cycle back around to find the glow of knowledge from our younger days that rejuvenates an inner spark and desire to want to learn about what surrounds us and how everything works.

Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?

Some of you may be wondering why there were so many questions asked throughout this post? Because if nobody asks questions, how do we discover anything new? How do learn where we come from? How do we know where we are going? Where do great white sharks mate? Do sharks really mistake humans for seals? How do painters dream up their masterpieces? Do aliens exist? Will somebody ever invent a teleportation device? How has there not been a new “Bill & Ted’s” adventure made in more than twenty years?

This week, it’s sharks. What will it be tomorrow? The day after that? Next week?

Good question.

Are You Thinking What I’m Thinking?

“Shark Week” conjures up feelings ranging between amazement and paralyzing fear. Truly a cultural spectacle. As it has been mentioned in a previous post (The Two Scariest Words: Dun-Dun), all of mankind (and womankind) can collectively thank the legendary Steven Spielberg for permanently planting the unforgettable soundtrack and classic scenes into our psyche regarding blockbuster entertainment coupled with beach safety.

Actually, given the number of great white sharks near coastlines at popular destinations around the world, a thank you really is in order. Thank you!

One of the annual traditions with “Shark Week” is watching crews for The Discovery Channel push new boundaries, like exploring the present-day existence of Megalodon or the “Rookin'” down in Louisiana. What will be next?

I’m glad you asked.

What fascinates me is not so much what we think of sharks, but what sharks think of us. Within the technological revolution that is currently booted up for generations to come, is there a neuroscientist somewhere who is dreaming up a water-proof device that could be tagged onto a great white shark that somehow measures and sends back its brain activity?

Think about that. More importantly, imagine that.

Before you begin calling mental institutions to reserve me a room (with an ocean view please), watch the clip below and tell me this diver was not interested in a similar endeavor. It’s only unbelievable until you do it.

If we are going to explore a seemingly infinite environment, we must have an equally infinite imagination.