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Carolina Beaches, Seeing Lots of Great White Sharks, Can’t Afford a Hurricane

All it would take is for the theme song from ‘Jaws’ to pop in my head while swimming in the ocean for a split second and I’d haul my you-know-what back to shore like I was Michael Phelps in the Olympics.

And if I lived in the Carolinas right now, I’d probably just chill on the beach with a Corona and lime, according to a recent CBS This Morning report.

Terrifying up close yet majestic at a distance, the Great White Shark is one of nature’s most feared and admired predators. Look no further than the national fandom surrounding the Discovery Channel’s annual television installment of ‘Shark Week.’

And what’s wild about the news story above is that when a shark is brought onto a boat without water to move around, it provides the scientists and viewers remarkable insight up close and personal with a fish we’d never hope to be in open water with during our lifetime. Looking at a living and breathing shark at a close distance is a paralyzing feeling, even through a video clip.

Just an incredible project by Ocearch.

Random Thought: What is a shark thinking when it’s brought onto a boat by people, like those on the Ocearch team.

Anyways, I recall watching a documentary about the 1975 summer blockbuster ‘Jaws’ in which director Steven Spielberg explains why he won’t go swimming in the ocean as he’s standing with Richard Dreyfuss (Matt Hooper) on the edge of a beach.

“They know I made this movie.”

And I’d like to think Mr. Spielberg has saved countless lives because he made his summer blockbuster more than four decades ago.

Wait for It…

#Nature.

The awesomeness of nature can be truly awe-inspiring. And people patiently watching for whales from the safety of a boat, when nothing particularly exciting was happening, were rewarded with something unforgettable.

Patience is a virtue good view.

Jaws Needs the Deep Blue Sea

Have you ever wondered why giant great white sharks (ie-Jaws) aren’t showcased in aquariums?

I’ll help you out with your curiosity.

In addition to the extensively reported video above, let’s not forget about Jaws 3-D (a great white shark swimming inside a Florida SeaWorld) and Deep Blue Sea (attempted the containment of giant great white sharks in the open ocean). Keeping these two fictional realities in mind likely made aquarium owners think twice about bringing in a large great white shark into its custody.

And yes, that’s very likely a true presumption.

Want another legitimate cinematic reference point of caution?

Enter Jurassic Park. As Dr. Ian Malcolm would say, “Life…finds a way.” And it’s not always what you want or expect.

As amazing as it would be to witness a giant great white shark from the comfort of an aquarium, that’s simply not realistic at this moment in time. Beyond being realistic, the safety of the shark and its handlers is priority number one. And this massive undertaking is not safe for both parties involved. It’s simply not worth the risk.

But, on the bright side, giant great white sharks continue to offer us an open invitation to visit them in the comfort of their home: the ocean.

I think I’m still busy that night.

The Real Deep Blue Sea

It seems as if Steven Spielberg’s defining summer blockbuster Jaws may have had more than just a toe dipped in the water involving the true events that inspired his film.

As people’s bravery increases simultaneously with the improved strength of metal cages designed for underwater hovering, their terrifying interactions with giant sharks reveal new discoveries about the aggressive, yet surprisingly tranquil super predators of the ocean.

Brand new footage of the largest shark ever recorded on video from a dive off the Mexican coast in 2013 was just released to the public. Her name is Deep Blue.

Deep Blue’s size is so colossal that it begs the question as to whether Spielberg and Co. built a new animatronic shark and let it loose in the waters off Guadalupe Island. This great white is suspected to be about 50 years-old and is estimated to be at least 20 feet long.

In the movie Jaws, the monster shark measured at around 25 feet.

It’s been 40 years and we still need a bigger boat.