Blog Archives

‘Tis the Season to Pledge Allegiance

Well, traditions technically begin with something happening for the first time…

Before we know it, families will gather and relatives will arrive for the holiday season. With Christmas just days away, it’s easy to settle into old habits. For many, that’s a reassuring feeling. Myself included. These moments bring a wonderful continuity in our lives. These traditions are special, nestled deep in our hearts.

Continuing from yesterday’s Christmas-themed movie favorite Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, I bring you yet another classic clip from a film that will surely be playing in homes across the country.

I am serious about National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation playing in homes across America and don’t call me Shirley.

#Family.

The Sound of Something Familiar

“The Sound of Music” is widely considered to be one of the best (if not the best) musicals ever written and performed, both as a play and as a major motion picture in 1959 and 1965, accordingly. Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer both gave unforgettable performances as Maria Rainer and Captain von Trapp in the film adaptation (plus we can’t forget about all the von Trapp children!). The movie received great acclaim with an Oscar for Best Picture.

It’s a beautifully entertaining classic now and forever into the future.

Last night, NBC attempted to revive the magic of “The Sound of Music” with a live 3-hour performance (with a commercial here and there). Favorite scenes and songs were portrayed and sung by the cast, led by Carrie Underwood, who took on the iconic task of Maria. Of course, there was “Sixteen Going on Seventeen” and “Do-Re-Mi.” However, let us not neglect for even another second about all of us universally recalling “My Favorite Things.”

Did Carrie Underwood do well? Was the high-pressured production worth the extraordinary effort? That answer will likely vary depending on one’s allegiance to the masterful film and Julie Andrews herself, but I found myself thinking of a different adaptation last night. Well, maybe just one specific scene 20 years after the sensational release of “The Sound of Music” movie.

It came to me like a dream…

Julie Andrews vs. Chevy Chase: It’s a toss-up (not really, but both give classic performances, just for different reasons)

First Snow = An Avalanche of Fun

For the first time this year, after waking up to “Christmas Lights” by Coldplay (ironically), my tired eyes witnessed the first snow covered morning outside my bedroom window. The very sight of snow was refreshing, despite the inevitable chill that would come from scraping snow and ice off my car. There is little to celebrate when cold weather is just that…cold. However, when Mother Nature gives us snow, she gives us all the chance to pursue amazing experiences that cannot even be contemplated in reality without a white winter wonderland.

Here are a few entertaining ideas for some surefire fun:

As long as you don’t stick your tongue to a pole, you’ll be fine!

We All Have an Ocean View

Information is addicting. Plain and simple. Those NBC commercials titled, “The More You Know” always spark an internal curiosity in me. Watching those brief messages on the weekend from NBC personalities is like taking a swig of Knowledgeade. 

I’m ready to go Mr. Lauer!

Aside from these brief, uplifting messages are a myriad of other outlets before us that present nearly unlimited opportunities for discovery and insight. The access to information on a daily basis is astonishing in the 21st century. It’s even borderline mesmerizing considering the world once existed and functioned well before a printing press was invented, let alone the pre-Internet era. Consider this: a phone is actually a computer first, with its calling capabilities down to probably third or fourth on the priority list of preferred functionality.

We all know it’s true. And if you think that’s an exaggeration, perhaps you are forgetting about the camera, your wide array of cool apps and your digital music player. Plus, don’t neglect the GPS (seriously, don’t neglect it).

Even the term “iCloud” has altered our perspective of the sky above us. No longer do we glance up into the open sky and blankly ponder the open space with imaginative daydreams. Instead, we look up and visualize data points and infinite transfers of structured and random information moving from Point A to Point B with a diagonal cut to Point S.

Is this a good evolutionary trait?

There are some nights when I look forward to relaxing and taking a break from writing papers and participating in the daily grind. Laying comfortably on a couch with a favorite show playing on the television in front of me, the urge becomes too overwhelming. I instantly (while simultaneously regretting it) open up my MacBook Pro that was closed and start searching for witty articles by a specific author or funny interview clips from a talk show.

On the one hand, it’s good that we are a people that is anxious and excited to seek and find new bits of information. Expanding our horizons should be viewed as a positive characteristic.

Still though, is it really positive that we’ve developed a never-ending quest for knowledge (traditional and non-traditional alike) that prevents us from taking necessary mental breaks?

On the knowledge front, we’ve all moved to the beach with a beautiful ocean view. Everyday, we look out into the vast blue, shimmering openness with the ambition to learn something new, knowing full well that complete knowledge is impossible. We take the dive regardless. On Wednesday, it’s waves hitting a bunch of rocks we see far to the right that stirs our inquisitiveness. On Thursday morning, we see surfers, which makes us want to learn about the history of surfing. Friday evening shows us fun being enjoyed on the boardwalk. Something clicks in our minds that we find too irresistible not to explore.

The rocks, surfers and people on a boardwalk represents something different to each of us. Regardless, these are topics we now find ourselves searching about…virtually nonstop.

While we may be exhausted, we are still seeing things we may never be able to or think to see again.

It’s a classic dilemma.

Speaking of classic…