Blog Archives

Bob Ley’s Legacy Is Exceptional, Sportive, Professional & Newsworthy

Bob Ley, 64-years-old, was one of the original ESPN SportsCenter reporters from 1979. Now, 40 years later, Bob Ley has announced he’s leaving the same yet different ESPN.

In addition to his sincere thanks to ESPN senior leadership and his loyal ESPN viewers for the past four decades, Mr. Ley posted the following on his Twitter account. This is an excerpt.

“Now it’s time for a change.

I will be retiring from ESPN, as of the end of this month. 

To be clear, this is entirely my decision. I enjoy the best of health, and the many blessings of friends and family, and it is in that context that I’m making a change.”  

In the final part of his Twitter statement, Mr. Ley ended with the following.

“In September, I signed off my last show saying, “I’ll catch you on the flip side.” Now it’s time to take that vinyl off the turntable (ask your folks), flip it over, and drop the needle on the B-side. There are always great cuts, and hidden gems on the B-side. 

Thank you for a great run.” 

What is Bob Ley’s next step? He didn’t say.

One thing we do know is that he is one of the original anchors who helped make ESPN the worldwide leader in sports. He has been — and surely will continue to be — a reliable sports journalist with wit who delivered uncompromised trust and authority to his audience. And as a soccer fan, I always enjoyed his high-quality analysis and reporting during ESPN’s past coverage of the FIFA World Cup.

As a matter of fact, the image below is Mr. Ley’s Twitter profile picture.

Bob Ley

As a matter of another fact, Dan Patrick — an anchor of ESPN from 1989-2006 — shared his thoughts on Bob Ley’s retirement announcement from the “DaDaDa, DaDaDa” network on his radio show.

Bob Ley will be viewed as one of the standard-bearers and nostalgic reference points for what made ESPN the worldwide leader in sports. He did his part by taking journalism as seriously as he took having fun and covering sports as a future unfolds in which that revolutionary network is being challenged by a wide variety of sports network upstarts — and established network giants — attempting to replicate those original (and wildly entertaining) sports journalists with those iconic four letters sewn on their jackets.

Thank you, Bob Ley.

And good luck with your future, which will hopefully involve covering the beautiful game in either human form or in 16-bits.

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The Origin of ‘The Big Bang Theory’

‘The Big Bang Theory’ ended its popular 12-season run last month. While the CBS primetime hit could have continued for at least another season, show co-creator Chuck Lorre was probably right not to force it forward by strong-arming Jim Parsons.

At least we still have ‘Young Sheldon’ with Jim Parsons narrating on CBS for the foreseeable future.

Speaking of Mr. Lorre — the veritable sitcom (though he hates the word sitcom) king of the modern era — I thought I’d throw it back to an interview he gave about seven years ago in which he described how ‘The Big Bang Theory’ came to be for its TV premiere in 2007.

For 12 years, ‘The Big Bang Theory’ was — to quote a memorable expression of optimism by Leonard in the pilot involving his crush on beautiful new neighbor Penny — smart and beautiful…

and, thankfully, not imaginary.

Taking the NeXT Step Starts With Saying ‘Hello’ in a New, Reassuring Way

Since his death on October 5, 2011, Steve Jobs has remained a beloved figure in Silicon Valley and comparable tech and innovation hubs around the world. His story — professional and personal — left a John Hancock-sized signature on the modern world’s ever-changing realization of the American Dream.

The technological legacy of Mr. Jobs, if required to be simplified in an industry defined by complication, was his gift for welcoming people into his vision of us connected and empowered through our own individualism. And his vision was first a revolutionary kind of personal computer (Macintosh), which evolved into a revolutionary personal music player (iPod) to a revolutionary phone (iPhone) and so on. Mr. Jobs knew that in order for people to buy into his vision — literally and figuratively — he would need his technological innovations to say something this evolving tech had never said before — literally and figuratively:

Hello.

The following video clip is from the beginning of the critically-acclaimed film ‘Steve Jobs’ directed by Oscar-winner Danny Boyle and starring Michael Fassbender and Oscar-winner Kate Winslet that recreates the morning-of struggle to fix a malfunctioning Macintosh computer before its big reveal to the world in 1984. The source material for this 2015 movie was based on the critically-acclaimed and biographical book Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson.

(FYI – There is one f-word spoken in the following video clip)

Now watch the real-life Macintosh reveal by the real Steve Jobs from 1984.

Why write a blog post about this Steve Jobs presentation from 35 years ago?

As Silicon Valley giants (cough cough Facebook) continue to face increasingly serious questions about its “supposed” commitment to privacy concerning user data, which most of us access through Apple product(s), it’s important to remember — for all of us — why we were so excited to welcome groundbreaking personal technology into our homes and lives more than three decades ago. These devices have transformed us for better and for worse to varying degrees. Jimmy’s Daily Planet has covered this subject matter and specifically how Apple CEO Tim Cook has targeted privacy and transparency as a cornerstone of his tenure leading the company. Mr. Cook’s privacy priority is admirable in this day and age for such a major, transformative player to take a reassuring stand in an industry with social media companies that are actively being confronted with user data issues.

How can tech giants return to the days of the mid-1980s shown above that were filled with optimism about the future by plugging into personal technology?

Like when Steve Jobs’ NeXT company failed spectacularly after getting fired by Apple’s board in 1985 in part because of the original Macintosh computer’s failure in the market, tech giants will likely stumble for a few years before righting the ship. But let’s remember that Steve Jobs ultimately rebounded for a comeback of a lifetime that came (after) NeXT. Mark Zuckerberg is not Steve Jobs, but he better take inspiration from him quickly to find a resolution in the same vein as Mr. Jobs with the same success and consumer support. The hope is the solution to the aforementioned problem will arrive sooner rather than later, but we’ll just have to wait and see on this critical societal concern.

For now, the public should be looking at personal technology and its apps with the excitable possibilities of Apple’s “hello” circa 1984 instead of a particular social media giant causing public concern with “goodbye personal privacy and security?” circa, well, today.

P.S. Facebook launching a cryptocurrency called Libra? Try addressing user privacy concerns first. 

In 1966, It Was Detroit vs. Maranello in France

The Ford Motor Company and Ferrari.

See, just reading it doesn’t look right. However, seeing the true story of how these two vastly different car companies headquartered a world apart — contrasted by luxury headquartered in Maranello, Italy and American ingenuity headquartered in Detroit, Michigan — crossed paths (well, crisscrossed on the same path) on the silver screen with Academy Award winners Christian Bale and Matt Damon does look right.

And intriguing. And enlightening. And, in 2019, quite surprising to the everyday car driver.

Will ‘Ford v Ferrari’ best Ron Howard’s thrilling 2013 racing film ‘Rush’ that was also based on an incredible true story? We’ll see.

Interestingly, riding around in my uncle’s Ford Mustang last week was proof enough for me of the American car maker’s prowess for building one hell of a powerful engine and sports car. Was a Ford superior to a Ferrari in the mid-’60s? Since director James Mangold’s film is based on a true story, I will not conduct research into the matter before the film’s release date to maintain the element of surprise. However, the fact that a movie has been made about this event suggests an excitingly dramatic finish regardless of the winner.

Gut Prediction: The name of the winning car company of that historic race in 1966 probably began with the letter “f.”

Let’s hope the film’s grade will be anything but.

From 20th Century FOX, ‘Ford v Ferrari’ arrives at a theater near you on November 15.