Blog Archives

I’m Not a Fan of Scrambled Eggs. Unless…

Please say this is true. C’mon. Do it. It would be incredible!

Or, as a sophisticated French person eating caviar before attending the opera would say, “incroyable!” 

Some sitcoms just need to keep going.

In less than 24 hours, the painful reality of a live-action ‘Aladdin’ hitting the silver screen in a few months sans the late, incomparable Robin Williams was relieved–in the form of an appropriate mind game—with the news from Dr. Frasier Crane Kelsey Grammer regarding a ‘Frasier’ revival. And what’s encouraging is that it sounds like the original cast and possibly some original writers, with the exception of the late John Mahoney, may be on board to tell a genuinely exciting new chapter of the amazing NBC sitcom that ended in 2004.

We all want more of this.

And this.

“Wish me luck.”

These were the final words spoken on the ‘Frasier’ series finale. Hopefully, there will be another series finale in the future.

Upon hearing the news of a potential ‘Frasier’ revival from the man himself, we’re all wishing him and that small group of people luck on bringing ‘Frasier’ back on the air again.

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Happy Monday

Well…hmmm…OK…I…huh.

Some character revivals should be left in the cartoon bottle.

Disney’s latest live-action-ish reboot of the 1992 animated smash success ‘Aladdin’ looks…well…hmmm…OK…I…

As a big fan of Will Smith, this particular role seems like it might be a good idea on paper yet once that paper is animated, it should’ve become perfectly clear that this is simply a character and story that should have stayed bottled from back in Disney’s 1992 vault. Why? Robin Williams.

Need I say more?

I’ll say a little bit more.

The late Robin Williams was a brilliant comedian and actor with a razor-sharp, racing imagination that we will never see again. He was hilarious–ironically with clean and blue comedy–and heartwarming and real and surreal all when he needed to be. That was his gift. And his vocal portrayal of the Genie in ‘Aladdin’ in the early ’90s was perfect and memorable. He brought the Genie to life in a way no other actor could. Attempting a live-action adaptation without Robin Williams just doesn’t work. It’s akin to going forward with ‘Mrs. Doubtfire 2’ without Robin Williams.

Will Smith, good intentions aside, cannot embody this Genie role. Pus, the blue look on Mr. Smith doesn’t help…at all (just ask Tobias Fünke). It looks like either a caricature or an imaginative letdown of the famed magical character in the trailer above.

After seeing the fan reaction to this brand new trailer–specifically, that one character–Disney may be hoping for a wish or two that might involve a time-traveling DeLorean.

Have a Better Week Than Last Week. 

P.S. The same scene–and more–involving the Genie from above, just with Robin Williams. 

You see my point. 

RIP Albert Finney

English actor Albert Finney has died at the towering age of 82.

Albert Finney was an accomplished actor who was nominated for an Oscar five times during his long career. He was in ‘Scrooge,’ ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ from 1974, ‘Skyfall’ and, my personal favorite, the imaginative ‘Big Fish.’

At this point, we are all thinking the same thing. So instead of delaying the inevitable, here is that scene from ‘Big Fish’ that everyone who was a fan of Albert Finney is thinking of right now.

It’s the magic of life celebrated the way we see it.

RIP Albert Finney. 

The Wilder Side of Life

Gene Wilder died on August 29, 2016.

His death still hurts and remains tragic because of the comedic characters he played, most especially Willy Wonka on the silver screen. And what made his portrayal so memorable and beloved by millions of kids and adults alike is that he possessed a very real three-dimensional quality (and bizarre new dimensions that looked other-worldly in some scenes) that was projected through a wacky two-dimensional character written in a book and screenplay.

Like his famed–and sadly fictional chocolate an candy factory–there was always something more there. There was something genuine lingering above the circus-like atmosphere and quintessential ’70s sets.

Back in March 2007, Gene Wilder gave an interview about his life and career. Portions of this conversation were animated into a condensed video series for PBS Digital Studios called “Blank on Blank.”

The reason for posting this interview today of an actor who died in 2016 is the same as why we will spontaneously watch ‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory’ that was released theatrically in 1971:

A random curiosity for wonder and reassurance of this thing in life called pure imagination.