Blog Archives

A Crash Course in Listening

“Speak softly and carry a big stick”
–President Theodore Roosevelt

Perhaps we should listen to softly spoken words and, from there, determine what we’ll carry…

Steven Spielberg is the greatest movie director of all-time. But how did he become a movie directing icon? The highly sought after position of Hollywood movie director requires mastering expensive, virtually unavailable and evolving technology, acquiring an acute knowledge of cameras, lighting and effects, gathering a Scrooge McDuck vault of gold coins for a single film and projecting an unforeseen vision of the world to be successful. People (business partners and fans alike) trust you to deliver on the biggest stage/screen. A hiccup could derail your dream in the same time it takes for two trains to crash.

Or, that’s the precise amount of time it takes for you to see everything.

Teachers come in all forms.

And when you realize that, you’ll be admitted to the greatest show on earth.

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A Comedy Icon with a Golden Legacy

In a show about virtually everything, Emmy-winning writer Chuck Martin and his good friend and boss Jerry Seinfeld rocked the Ohio Theatre last night with daily observations that left the audience with nothing but pure laughter, joy and appreciation for two men from the world of entertainment that hilariously exposed all the annoying things in life that they and we encounter and comment on on a daily, continuous basis.

One example?

How about how we directly define our own personal energy with the precise battery percentage on our phones (you know it’s true!). Once it gets below 20%, the game’s over. Your day has ended. Sadly, it’s only 2:17 p.m.

The show (and the 2nd row seats: a sincere thank you to my sister!) were the real deal and it was all spectacular.

Now, here’s a juxtaposition for you to contemplate this Friday before the Oscars: What would Jerry Seinfeld be like hosting the Academy Awards?

He would be the host of an awards show about nothing.

Genius.

A Rhetorical Abstention from Reality

Here is a brief recap of President Obama’s State of the Union speech from last night:

No serious proposal for opportunity-centric tax reform to help the middle class and low-wage earners
No legitimate solutions that would help those living in poverty move up into the middle class, far above the poverty line
No hints of genuine bipartisanship
No fresh, new vision for a country hurting in a stagnant economy exacerbated by his policies
No debate or reconsideration/adjustment at all on climate science-related policies, even though Europe (of all places) is scaling back funding for such projects and the fact that scientists are progressively suggesting a mini-Ice Age may be upon us (the Polar Vortex, anyone?)
No mention of the debt
No mention of excessive government spending
No reexamination or humble remarks regarding Obamacare as he refuses to even entertain suggestions dealing with structural changes from Republicans, despite his nearly 20 executive orders/delays for the law
No new, innovative plans for the energy sector that would produce jobs and energy now

Nope, nothing.

And President Obama and the media calls the Republican Party the “Party of No”?

Happy Monday!

Last Friday, the movie “Jobs” premiered to the public. Ashton Kutcher, who is an aspiring tech savant of sorts, stars as the hippie turned global business icon Steve Jobs. Their looks and mannerisms are crazy similar. The conversation surrounding the driven co-founder and innovator of Apple has been reignited.

If there is one quality that continues to attract people of various backgrounds to the life and career of Jobs, it may be his inspirational aura that lives on posthumously. Below is just a snippet, but grandiose nonetheless. It’s the conclusion of his 2005 Commencement Address at Stanford University.

Two words to describe it: insanely great!

“Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish”