Blog Archives

Happy 4th of July

Happy 243rd Birthday, America!

Celebrating the 4th of July is truly an amazing experience as an American, whether as a kid or an adult. Being able to live in the greatest country in the history of the world, one that, according to the Preamble to the Constitution, challenges its citizens “to form a more perfect Union.”

If we work and aspire to make it so, then tomorrow will be better than today.

Today is (aside from season 3 of ‘Stranger Things’ dropping on Netflix with its July 4th-themed premiere set in 1985), the perfect occasion to remember how it all started for the United States of America just before it was the United State of America.

Let’s travel back in time to this country’s inspired declaration.

God Bless the United States of America. 

Advertisements

The 75th Anniversary of D-Day, as Seen by a 97-Year-Old D-Day Veteran

75 years after Allied forces landed on the beaches of Normandy, France — which remains the largest invasion involving land & water — it’s as important as ever to honor and celebrate the brave soldiers who risked their lives in World War II and changed the world. The ripples of water on Normandy’s coast between the years 1944 and 2019, defined by war then and peace now, as well as the immeasurable consequence of succeeding more than seven decades ago, must be remembered forever.

As reported on CNN,

In a broadcast message to troops before they leave, Eisenhower tells them, “The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to victory…We will accept nothing less than full victory!”

Here is the full speech (with footage from World War II) by General Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Since it is the 75th anniversary of D-Day, it seems fitting to commemorate this historical occasion with something special for one of the American soldiers who fought bravely on the beaches of Normandy in 1944 by parachuting into life-threatening danger.

97-year-old Tom Rice, who was a member of the 101st Airborne Division as a Paratrooper during World War II, is an inspiration to us all.

Thank you, Mr. Rice and all of the soldiers who fought for the Allied Forces in Normandy on D-Day 75 years ago. 

Happy Veterans Day

Today is Veterans Day, and it’s not just important but necessary that we honor those who have served and are serving in our armed forces. The good news is we want to honor those who put their lives on the line for us here at home. The slightly awkward part is sometimes determining exactly what the best way to accomplish this recognition?

Is thanking a veteran enough? Most are humble, choosing to step aside from the spotlight of elaborate recognition. What do they prefer, particularly when it occurs serendipitously in a casual setting?

As part of his surprise visit to Saturday Night Live for an appearance on ‘Weekend Update,’ Lt. Com. Dan Crenshaw had a damn good idea.

Plus a few great laughs were had alongside SNL cast member Pete Davidson who righted a wrong from a week ago in classy–and entertaining–fashion.

Never Forget is right.

Happy Veterans Day. 

That Famous Moon Shot

The United States won the “space race” against the Soviets on July 20, 1969. This long, dedicated pursuit and historic flight to space–through the lens of Neil Armstrong–is the focus of the film ‘First Man.’

Seems straightforward, right?

And yet there has been controversy recently surrounding the forthcoming film ‘First Man’ because there isn’t a scene that depicts the American flag literally being planted on the moon. While I will withhold final judgment until after seeing this movie, it seems like a bad call by a director–Damien Chazelle–who has made so many right calls in his young, burgeoning filmmaking career.

Without getting into the weeds here, the moon landing was an American achievement that inspired this country and the world.

That’s just reality.

Another reality is that the third trailer for ‘First Man’ is the best one yet.

Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, but he did so with the help and support of an entire nation back on earth.

That fact can’t be omitted from history.