Blog Archives

Electric Cars Are Barely Making Noise on the Road

In the US, electric cars still make up less than 1 percent of new car sales. The path to 100 percent will be a long one, and the engine won’t cede such ground without a fight.
–As Electric Cars Surge, the Gas Engine Keeps Getting Better, Jack Stewart, WIRED Online

More people today likely know the name Elon Musk than Nikolaus August Otto. While Mr. Musk is believed by some to be the tech and pop-culture heir of sorts to the late Steve Jobs, Mr. Otto paved the way for what is known today as the internal combustion engine way back in the 19th century.

As Tesla’s are being bought and seen on the road, Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s journey of an electric future is still in the crawling phase in many ways. Admittedly, that “1% of new car sales” statistic is surprising. Arguably, Tesla’s car line is evolving as the leader in the promising development of electric cars. Make no mistake that the pursuit of an emissions-free transportation future is admirable and intriguing. Combining a positive environmental impact with a dynamic and exciting product in the free market is a win-win scenario. The all-electric car is an impressive invention that should and will improve in the coming years and decades, along with its necessary and developing infrastructure. And yet, let’s not ignore the realities of society-altering innovations as technology continues to expand into every aspect of our lives, both professionally and personally.

As strange as it may read, we are facing a sophisticated, consequential dilemma with Tesla and its part in an electric transportation future. Will it be as promising and as beneficial as we want it to be? Wherever there’s electricity, there’s a grid that’s inevitably accompanied by a power struggle. Remember that. And in every situation, there are costs and benefits to seriously consider. With that in mind, as Tesla continues to sell and improve its various models one-by-one, let’s take the time to reflect on what the future would be if and when that 99%-1% statistic is one day flipped.

Random question: What are your thoughts on dealing with tech support?

Riding in a Tesla, according to reports, is a smooth and mostly noiseless ride. This is one of the bonuses of an electric engine that doesn’t roar like a Mustang. That is until you hit bumps in the road because there are always bumps in the road. But if we take the time to plan, we can avoid the greatest damage before it’s too late.

We should be equally excited and cautious concerning innovation. Moreover, we should be ready to not just ask when something new will happen, but what happens when it does.

Innovation has a long arc, so we best prepare for that long ride when that new road finally arrives and is here for the long, quiet haul.

Advertisements

Happy Monday!

The expression goes “It’s always darkest before the dawn.” Keeping that in mind, does that mean there can be some brief, necessary levity to be discovered deep within or around the most unlikely and darkest hours? According to Winston Churchill/Gary Oldman in Darkest Hour, perhaps.

Life, in its many situations, isn’t always as it appears.

Two fingers thumbs up.

Have a Better Week Than Last Week (with a good laugh). 

Dunkirk’s Darkest Hour

Have two highly-acclaimed films ever been so perfectly matched as accompanying entities?

This year, Christopher Nolan’s gritty on-the-beach dramatization of the historically necessary evacuation of hundreds of thousands of British soldiers in Dunkirk was hailed as an incredible war movie unlike any other. You were on the beach, you were in the air and you felt the literal and metaphorical claustrophobia of what seemed like inevitable demise closing in. It was a matter-of-fact story that took audiences into the living hell of British and French soldiers under deadly German air attacks.

Also this year, just weeks ago, Joe Wright’s Darkest Hour was hailed as an engaging peek into the life of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Faced with the end of the British armed forces, Western civilization, and the world in domino fashion by Germany in World War II,  Mr. Oldman’s metamorphosis into Mr. Churchill was a masterclass in acting brilliance. To put it briefly, Winston Churchill in Darkest Hour was an ordinary man who, through cigars, booze, unlikely confidants, ingenuity, courage and his wife, was able to lead the rescue of soldiers struggling for their lives on the beaches of Dunkirk in a matter-of-fact manner on the silver screen.

Movie fans should see both films, both for historic and cinematic purposes. But what if you could see them interwoven together in an epic trailer?

While Gary Oldman has all but sealed up a forthcoming season of Best Actor awards for his performance as Winston Churchill, there’s an argument for cinematic history to be made with regards to the Best Picture of 2017:

Dunkirk + Darkest Hour.

The Academy will likely not comply. Regardless, history is eternally thankful for the ordinary heroes showcased in both films.

Winston’s (Signature) Caper?

Carrying over from yesterday’s blog post, I recommend you go to a theater near you to see Darkest Hour. Not only for history’s sake but to witness a brilliant performance of a British leadership icon by a fellow British icon of a different sort.

Gary Oldman is something special portraying Winston Churchill in Darkest Hour. Plus, Mr. Oldman showed in a behind-the-scenes clip that his talent isn’t restricted to just the dramatic arts…

If those dance moves don’t inspire you for the forthcoming New Year celebrations, I don’t know what will.

We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall get jiggy with it in the streets celebrating victory!