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Posting Up Against Giants

Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep, and Steven Spielberg walk into a newsroom…

Journalism, not the shouting on cable news, is invaluable in a democracy. More specifically, the gritty, old-school reporting approach with pen marks galore, endless stacks of paper and the pursuit of revealing the greater truth to an “off-limits” story instead of merely getting there/yelling something inflammatory first is increasingly becoming a relic of the past.

And it’s in this pre-digital past that Steven Spielberg ventured into for a modern-day reflection. Plus, Mr. Spielberg was able to bring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep together for the first time for a major motion picture.

Steven Spielberg’s forthcoming film The Post isn’t necessarily aiming to revitalize print journalism as much as it seems to be directed towards reigniting the spark of a thoughtful, determined American media.

Considering the times we live, in which news in the political, sports and entertainment spheres are indistinguishably blurred together and run and broadcasted by powerful insiders (former athletes, political operatives, and commentators on both sides, etc.), the question that lingers is, “Who can those on the outside trust?”

It is likely that The Post won’t comprehensively answer this critical question, but this film will transport audiences back to a time when there was information you knew and information you didn’t know. “Metrics” and “analytics” hadn’t yet become fancy synonyms for information. Journalists took a breath, focused and refocused a few times, went to work all day and night while framing a report in a context that far exceeded the words and margins of the said story.

Even when the story was (like in this film) larger-than-life and full of high-level risks and stakes for a nation asking important high-level questions.

The leaking of the Pentagon Papers had its fair share of controversy. It will be interesting to see how the legendary director chose to tell and frame historically significant events involving real people. Nonetheless, the Pentagon Papers and the Washington Post have received the top-shelf Spielbergian treatment in The Post that stars Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep set for theatrical release this Christmas.

And then set for ordering on Amazon several months later.

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Happy Monday!

For a while, there appeared to be no gravitational pull against Best Director Alfonso Cuarón’s space masterpiece as the film soared with Oscar after Oscar after Oscar (7 in total), except for the two it should have collected at the end of the night (especially for Best Picture).

Still, Gravity made a bold statement in 2013 and early into 2014. And we cannot neglect the other triumphant winners in Frozen (including Best Original Song), Dallas Buyers Club (Jared Leto & Matthew McConaughey), The Great Gatsby (3 golden statues) and 12 Years a Slave (Best Actress: Lupita Nyong’o & Best Picture).

The 86th Academy Awards was a night full of speeches, tributes and celebration (and pizza!). If only there was a single picture that captured the spirit of the entire evening…

Twitter

Twitter

I am proud to say I was among the millions of people who retweeted this photo that set the record as the most retweeted picture in history (it even broke Twitter for a little while: true story).

And, let it be known that the words Caddyshack, Ghostbusters and Groundhog Day were spoken on the Oscars stage last night.

Thank you Bill Murray (and of course Harold Ramis).

Let your imagination run wild today, this week and far off into the future!

Happy Monday!