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Happy Monday

This blog post will forever change your perception of the phrase, “putting your own spin on things.”

Individually, we all have something unique to offer. And once we discover and understand this distinctive gift within ourselves, then we have the potential to change things in substantial (even unforgettable) ways.

Okay, enough with the ambiguous set-up.

Check out this impossible free kick that Brazilian Roberto Carlos, somehow, made possible against France back in 1997.

Yes, Roberto Carlos owns the crazy surreal free kick. True story. However, there are plenty of other incredible things we can do that can spark the same kind of awe and amazement…

like disproving gravity.

Well, you’ll never know what you can do unless you try (not disproving gravity, but something equally awesome).

Have a Better Week Than Last Week.

Rio’s Fun Run

You won’t see this everyday.

  1. Usain Bolt (19.78 seconds)
  2. Andre De Grasse (19.80 seconds)

The finish line of the second 200m semifinal heat captured above features possibly the two fastest sprinters in this event in Usain Bolt from Jamaica and Canadian sprinter Andre De Grasse. “The Lightning Bolt” (29-years-old) has even said the latter (21-years-old) could one day take over the 200m crown, once the world’s fastest man retires, of course.

Running and jumping in Junior Olympics and AAU summer track competitions from the third grade through high school, I can say that track & field is an intense sport. An amazingly fun sport, absolutely, but intense. By intense, I mean that every second, split-second, inch and movement is micro-analyzed. All the training and blood, sweat and tears that drip in the summer heat during practice is meant to achieve the maximum results because every second, split-second, inch and movement matters.

Whether the stakes are qualifying for the next race, meet or making the medal podium, competing loose (yet with acute concentration) is the name of the game.

Keeping this sport’s competitive spirit in mind, that’s what makes the finish of the 200m semifinal heat with Usain Bolt and Andre De Grasse seen above a genuinely special anomaly. The two world-class sprinters were easily 1-2 in their heat to qualify for the final tomorrow night and, surprisingly, chose to showcase their friendly rivalry to the world in an unlikely setting.

Thankfully, this moment of playful sportsmanship was captured.

Usain Bolt said in an interview with NBC’s Lewis Johnson immediately following the race tonight that he was expecting Andre De Grasse to ease up at the finish line to save energy for the final. Makes perfect sense. However, the Canadian had an alternative plan and instead chose to sprint to the 200m finish line as fast as possible to remind “The Lightning Bolt” that he’ll have a serious challenge tomorrow night.

NBC was given a preview to an Olympics version of “Must See TV.”

Track & Field is such an incredible sport and, hopefully, the fun pic between Usain Bolt and Andre De Grasse will increase viewership for the 200m final tomorrow night at 9:30 p.m. ET. and possibly inspire yet another striking moment in the event:

The unthinkable sub-19 second 200m.

We all know that a lightning bolt strikes with authority (and apparently a grin).

Happy Monday!

Lightning struck last night in Rio for the third time.

Usain Bolt is scary fast and awesomely entertaining. NBC journalist Bob Costas made the astute observation that Bolt is not a show-off, but is, more accurately, a showman. And Mr. Costas was proven right late last night when the legendary Jamaican sprinter beat American rival Justin Gatlin by .08 seconds in the breathtaking 100m final for his mind-boggling third consecutive Olympic gold medal and immediately joined in festive celebration with his countless fans along the rail of the track immediately following his epic conquest. His warm-down style is by far the best in the world.

Above all the entertaining bravado, Usain Bolt is a class act. This video/interview is from a few years ago.

The world-class 100m Olympic final was pretty close.

  1. Usain Bolt (9.81)
  2. Justin Gatlin (9.89)
  3. Andre De Grasse (9.91)

Even with the razor-thin margins between Bolt and Gatlin & Gatlin and De Grasse, Usain Bolt dominated everyone’s focus at the finish line. The man that Mr. Costas determined is now a more famous figure in Jamaica than Bob Marley (hmmm…?) is a larger-than-life athlete and persona. Standing (and sprinting) at a towering 6’5″, the “Lightning Bolt” has kept our attention for several Olympics and international competitions.

Back in 2013 at the IAAF World Championships in Moscow, Russia, Mother Nature went as far as to validate Usain Bolt’s perfectly given last name.

Remember this surreal, once-in-a-lifetime moment?

lat-bolt-wre0010839745-20130811

(Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images)

Fans of Usain Bolt won’t have wait long to see his next strides toward Olympic glory. The Jamaican sprinter will run in the 200m tomorrow morning. As his 9.58 seconds world record in the 100m, 19.19 seconds world record in the 200m and the picture above reveal, you know something special will happen.

Wherever Usain Bolt is, a show is sure to follow.

A lightning show, to be specific.

Have a Showstopper Kind of Week!

Even Zeus Was Impressed

Gold medals are a pretty cool thing to accumulate and make space for on the shelf and every collection has to start with that first piece.

Or race.

Michael Phelps, competing in the 400m Individual Medley (as seen above) at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, started his gold medal legacy. And with a world record, no less. That’s just crazy impressive. The greatest swimmer in the sport’s history, by every modern standard and measure, has been dominating in the pool and with casual sports fans alike for a dozen years. Perhaps the most surreal reality, however, is that Michael Phelps isn’t finished in Rio.

His pursuit for gold continues.

Simply put: Michael Phelps is defining his own Gold Rush era with his stellar performances spanning the past few summer Olympics.

The Rolling Michael Phelps Gold Medal Count: 22.