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Will ‘The Big Bang Theory’ End in the Right Spot With Fans (and Sheldon)?

Since tomorrow’s blog post will be filled with personal anecdotes connected to ‘The Big Bang Theory’ — beginning with the pilot episode in 2007 — it seems right to keep it concise today.

12 years of Sheldon, Leonard, Penny, Howard, Raj, Bernadette and Amy (plus Stuart) is sadly ending. And the show will surely conclude with a special pause-worthy vanity card by show co-creator Chuck Lorre after the credits roll. It will be interesting to see the final-final note on ‘The Big Bang Theory.’

In preparation for tomorrow’s main event…

The hour-long series finale of the global hit ‘The Big Bang Theory’ airs tomorrow at 8 p.m. ET. on CBS.

An Elevator Pitch Lifted the Co-Creator of the ‘The Big Bang Theory’

Continuing this week’s dedicated blog posts leading up to the series finale of ‘The Big Bang Theory’ this Thursday night on CBS, it’s time to learn about the man behind the outcast science nerds.

Chuck Lorre, TV’s 66-year-old mega-producer of popular sitcoms half-hour comedies, including ‘The Big Bang Theory,’ did not have a traditional route to his current position. In actuality, his long and winding path to the executive producer, show creator and showrunner that everyone wants today pivoted on the spur of the moment with a succinct determination that translated into one of the best elevator pitches.

It was an elevator pitch that, unlike a broken elevator in a certain Pasadena apartment complex, worked to help him move on up to the successful side of life.

Kaley Cuoco, Jim Parsons, Johnny Galecki, Simon Helberg, Kunal Nayyar, Melissa Rauch, and Mayim Bialik will be missed as a cast. Together, they delivered in so many ways — comedically as well as with those rare sweet moments like the napkin signed by Leonard Nimoy — that made them and ‘The Big Bang Theory’ must-see TV for 12 years. But we must also give credit to the men and women behind the scenes and cameras on set for creating the fictional world within Pasadena’s science community that millions of people around the world relate to and enjoy.

Chuck Lorre is one of these people.

And his personal story from a struggling musician to a prime time storyteller is not theoretical. It evolved his way, according to the script he was unknowingly writing for himself more than three decades ago.

The Space Between Truth and Fiction Is Not so Strange Anymore

A black hole is photographed for the first time, thanks in part to Katie Bouman.

“Three years ago, Bouman led the creation of an algorithm that eventually helped capture this first-of-its-kind image: a supermassive black hole and its shadow at the center of a galaxy known as M87. She was then a graduate student in computer science and artificial intelligence at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.”

–Michelle Lou and Saeed Ahmed, CNN, ‘That image of a black hole you sae everywhere today? Thank this grad student for making it possible’

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) -- a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration -- was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

Amazing. And this amazement applies to the first image of a black hole in space as well as Ms. Bouman’s ground–well, space–breaking algorithm.

Life is about pushing boundaries, which is a particular topic of interest with the release of ‘First Man’ starring Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy and the recent theatrical release of the CNN documentary ‘Apollo 11’ chronicling America’s groundbreaking moon landing. While in awe of the image shown above, American theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate Kip Thorne and the science fiction epic ‘Interstellar’ by Christopher Nolan immediately came to mind. ‘Interstellar,’ while fiction, is painstakingly rooted in real science. Creating a realistic depiction of a black hole was pivotal to the story for the filmmakers, writers, and audience.

Was the ‘Interstellar’ crew right with their image of a black hole back in 2014?

Kip Thorne, Christopher Nolan, and the entire ‘Interstellar’ team were pretty damn close with their depiction of a black hole in 2014 to the first image of a black hole in 2019!

Who else is going to watch ‘Interstellar’ again?

This scientific revelation as compared to a cinematic epic validates and builds upon the lore of Mr. Nolan’s brilliance as a filmmaker and storyteller of spaces beyond our earthly realities. More importantly, the first image of a black hole is a game-changer in ways we are only just beginning to comprehend.

Yesterday was another giant leap for mankind.

The Apotheosis Countdown

Sitting in the studio audience during the pilot–an unforgettable experience with my dad back in the spring of 2007–‘The Big Bang Theory’ was immediately clear for take-off into the stratosphere of successful network television sitcoms. And it’s still a smash success more than a decade later in 2019.

This NASA-like launch was significantly helped (perhaps fittingly) by eventual NASA astronaut on the show Howard Wolowitz, who is played by the very funny Simon Helberg. His character’s introduction into the show is simply among the best in sitcom history.

And Penny’s intro, played by the funny and beautiful Kaley Cuoco, falls into the very same category, just for slightly different reasons.

Well, I made sure to save this scene for my blog.

Now in its twelfth and final season, the show about men and women who are equal parts science geniuses and socially awkward nerds (plus Penny and Zack) is reaching its summit with less than twelve new episodes remaining.

After tonight, the official count is nine new ‘Big Bang Theory’ episodes.

And there are still plenty of questions to be answered regarding current storylines for major and supporting characters. These lingering unresolved questions will help ensure a thoroughly entertaining final stretch for the show. Relating back to the pilot, there are key questions that need to be answered before the show takes its final bow:

  • What is Penny’s last name?
  • Why has Howard been wearing an unexplained alien pin on his shirt during every single episode of the series?

Before we discover these fun tidbits in the next couple of months by sitcom royalty Chuck Lorre and Co., let’s venture to a preview of tonight’s episode. Amazingly, I was in the audience for the taping of the following episode, “The Donation Oscillation,” with my mom and dad just a couple of weeks ago!

‘The Big Bang Theory’ is just as funny and entertaining live as I remembered it to be:

Witty and laugh-out-loud hilarious.

Bazing–

It’s getting a little tougher to say it without getting teary-eyed.

‘The Big Bang Theory’ airs on CBS on Thursdays at 8 p.m. ET.