The Eternal Prison of Revenge

Colpevole.

The next bizarre chapter of the Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito saga begins with the two former lovers being found guilty/colpevole by a Florentine appeals court. When the verdict came down yesterday, it had to be utterly surreal and downright depressing (mentally, emotionally and even physically) for Knox and Sollecito.

The two most important questions at this juncture: how and why?

How could there be a guilty verdict if there wasn’t any new, groundbreaking evidence to definitively prove that Knox and her former boyfriend committed murder against Meredith Kercher or that they were even at the scene that treacherous night? For a moment, contemplate the places you’ve walked through and sat down just today in the past ten minutes. Could you retrace your steps exactly as you took them and then clean literally every single spec and trace of your presence?

If it seems impossible, it’s because it is, unless you’re a villain from The Blacklist. And even then…

And, if Knox and Sollecito did pull off that impossible feat for themselves, why did they leave their partner-in-crime Rudy Guede with his DNA everywhere? If so, why didn’t Guede ever mention such a betrayal? It’s usually quite difficult to disclose something that didn’t really happen, which is why nothing like this was ever divulged.

Having followed the case closely, as well as having read Knox’s book that details her painful and exhaustive account, this case is not 100% clear-cut. That’s been well established. There were a few questionable reactions by Knox, but none of which was ever attached with hard evidence that would lead to her to be deemed guilty. To proclaim her guilt based on wild conjecture requires one hell of a story.

Why has this specific case extended far beyond a standard legal trial for murder? Sadly, ulterior motives seem to be part of the never-ending argument being formed by the prosecutor and his wild and disturbed imagination, the Italian police originally involved, the Italian public and the Italian legal system as a whole. A legitimate hypothesis is that they all feel forever embarrassed by how the world saw them investigate and conduct themselves throughout this highly publicized, divisive and scrutinized trial.

There is justice to be had, but it seems like one side is eternally clouded by bitter revenge.

One more thought to reflect on is whether or not the Kercher family owes (now or in the future) Knox and Sollecito an apology? Why is this question being asked? Think about what has been determined by hard evidence: Rudy Guede was at the crime scene with his DNA everywhere (including the walls, floor, bed comforter, the bathroom and Meredith’s body). He was a known criminal who had previously broken into other buildings. He then fled on a train out of the country the very next morning after the murder took place.

With the evidence lacking against Knox and Sollecito, and while being completely sympathetic to the Kercher family wanting to know every detail and to receive every bit of justice for their daughter and sister (100% understandable), it seems like what they have relentlessly put two innocent kids through in a suspect (at best) legal system multiple times should be at least mentioned.

Knowing that the above statement was a very sensitive and controversial proposition to bring up, it still seems like a legitimate point to make. Would the Kercher family feel the same way about their persistence of assumed guilt for Knox if their daughter was in Amanda’s shoes and Meredith was subjected to the same scrutiny and fantastical stories by the prosecutor, Knox family and local media?

Rudy Guede, who was proven guilty with overwhelming evidence and a confession, is locked up behind bars.

And yet, this is all just another crazy chapter in a surreal story that ceases to have a real ending.

Advertisements

Posted on January 31, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: