Blog Archives

13 Minutes in the Abyss

Incredible. Terrifying. Breathtaking.

Allow yourself to escape for just 13 minutes to watch freediver Guillaume Néry escape underwater into parts of various oceans most of us consider to be unknown territory in his short film ‘One Breath Around the World.’ If for nothing else, witness what fearful serenity looks like in this brand new project in concert with National Geographic that, once again, affirms its reputation of visually capturing the limits of what’s possible in new and daring ways.

In some circles, the belief is that perception can be more real than reality. A valid point. Does ‘One Breath Around the World’ challenge that notion?

If Guillaume Néry’s adventurous freediving into the various depths of the world’s oceans doesn’t get your heart racing with adrenaline and imagination for how you can apply his underwater explorations to your life, then I don’t know what will.

One thing I do know is that Mr. Néry may soon be receiving an offer to join Jason Momoa in the ‘Aquaman’ sequel.

Amber’s (Pre) Historic Reveal

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(R.C. McKellar, Royal Saskatchewan Museum)

Remember Dr. Alan Grant’s theory of connectivity between velociraptors (raptor meaning “bird of prey”) and birds in the 1993 cinematic masterpiece Jurassic Park? 

Well, this at least seems to be pointed towards that direction.

“…this is the first time that scientists are able to clearly associate well-preserved feathers with a dinosaur, and in turn gain a better understanding of the evolution and structure of dinosaur feathers.”

–Kristin Romey, National Geographic

In perfect harmony, the sample discussed in the above quotation was preserved in discovered, yes, a piece amber about the size of an apricot that’s been dried! True story: Fans of the movie just gasped.

While this is exciting news in the paleontology world, it’s worth noting that this discovery in northern Myanmar doesn’t appear to be a gateway to a real-life Jurassic Park. A bummer, for sure. However, learning new facts and realities about such a fascinating, prehistoric period in history is incredible. It’s the latest proof and vindication of life’s eternal pursuit of knowledge and its countless mysteries waiting to be revealed with the right amount of curiosity and tenacity.

Thankfully, Jurassic Park sparked a societal interest across generations in events and creatures from more than 65 million years ago.

Michael Crichton and Steven Spielberg found a way.